Showing all 19 results

  • EU/UK

    Hyundai Staria camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢242Width ↔125Height ↕136

    Hyundai Staria is the Multivan of MPVs – swivel seats with configurable positions, it comes in either a 6 or 9-seat version. It trumps the Multivan in consumption – not by a huge margin though.Β  A big car for sure – the seats can be folded down giving you almost 2.5m legroom. The irony is though (the same as with a Multivan) that you are paying a premium for those luxury seats, only to then hide them under a mattress (or you’ll have to remove them to get some storage space for your camping gear). Albeit you could sleep on those reclining middle seats for a few nights too. Or go for the van (cargo) model – it’s a bit longer and taller + you can make it your own + it’s cheaper. It’s labelled as an MPV, but really, it’s just like a Multivan, not like a Caddy. We may see these categories blend somehow in the future…

    As this car spans two categories: MPVs and People Carriers – I’d rate it as follows:Β 

    • MPV rating: 4/5
    • People Carrier rating: 3.7/5


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  • US

    Kia Carnival Camper (Sedona)

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢244Width ↔120Height ↕122

    A big and comfy car that eats a lot. Kia Carnival is for you if you are looking for lots of space and a comfortable ride and don’t mind paying more on fuel. New models tend to cost a lot more than your typical MPV, but it should be possible to find a used one for a good price.


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  • EU/UK

    VW Caddy Maxi Camper boot size

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢225Width ↔117Height ↕126

    The VW Caddy Maxi Life is one of the biggest MPVs out there and probably the best small camper van option out there. If boot size is your primary criteria – you can’t go wrong with a Caddy. The car drives good too. Where it lacks a bit is comfort – it takes after its van origins and offers a more basic interior. But it makes up for it in storage – it really has a lot of compartments all over the place. It’s not the best car to take off the road completely – but you can take it down a good enough mud road without any big problems. A very good car camping / microcamping conversion candidate, unless you are planning to drive through forests and very much offroad – or you prefer a higher class interior comfort.Β 

    In the UK, the Caddy Maxi Life is registered as a car (not a van), so can go at a higher speed limit than the equivalent van.Β 


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  • EU/UK

    VW Sharan camper boot size

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢209Width ↔125Height ↕113

    The VW Sharan strikes a good balance between size and comfort. Actually, it’s one of the biggest MPV’s out there. If boot size is your primary criteria – you can’t go wrong with a Sharan. The car drives nicely too and offers good comfort in the front for the driver and passenger. It’s not the best car to take off the road completely – but you can take it down a good enough mud road without any big problems. A very good car camping / microcamping conversion candidate, unless you are planning to drive through forests and very much offroad.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    VW ID Buzz camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢220Width ↔122Height ↕118

    This post gathers information about various versions of the ID Buzz as they become available. Latest update – 12. February 2023 – added the ID Buzz Cargo boot length, width and height.

    The king of camper vans received an electric upgrade. Actually, not just electric – the interior is looking very cosy and spacious too, as less room is needed for an engine + all its moving parts – which are now all underneath the cabin. The multifunctional rear seats + table and swivel front seats make it a very versatile car to camp in. And we do like a lot of space in our campers, don’t we!
    The double floor + rear seats folding flat to create a surface for a mattress look very handy – compared to a Multivan, where you have to level the seats with something.

    The ID Buzz Cargo version’s official dimensions are now available (1), making the electric small van one of the top campers in the People Carrier / Panel Van categories. If its boot was just a bit taller, it would take the first slot, but it’s overtaken by Fiat Doblo High Roof or the Hyundai Staria Cargo. However, it still offers plenty of room, a modular interior and of course – it’s 100% electric.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Ford Transit Connect camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢215Width ↔124Height ↕129

    A panel van that feels and drives better than a van. It has very good safety scores and is well-rated across other websites. It offers a good-sized cargo area, about average for a panel van. Not the biggest, but it makes up for it with higher comfort when driving and in the cabin. The barn doors on most models are a downside, but they have a small plus point – you can open them all the way towards the front, by the sides of the car so that they won’t get in your way. You just won’t have a roof like you would with a tailgate.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Nissan NV200 camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢204Width ↔119Height ↕135

    The Nissan NV200 is a very spacious car for its size. It is one of the tallest and offers a lot of headroom for a DIY camping conversion. Where it lacks behind is drive and interior comfort. It’s not a vehicle you would choose for long journeys – but of course, if you are not used to the comfort of higher class MPVs like a Sharan or your previous car, this won’t be a problem. It will get you there and you’ll be happily camping in its big boot, especially if you want to do your own DIY camper conversion or buy a camping box. For a simple conversion (not putting many storage options in) it doesn’t offer many built-in storage compartments in the back, you better come up with some good solutions yourself.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Chrysler Grand Voyager Camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢230Width ↔123Height ↕115

    The Grand Voyager is big and comfy. At places too comfy – a fold-up TV isn’t really necessary for camping, so although it’s a big car, you’ll be paying for unnecessary luxuries. These also add unnecessary weight, increasing its consumption. It’s, therefore, more expensive to run and harder to drive. These luxuries are also not spent wisely – again, the drive is according to most reviews online, just OK. The fold-up TV doesn’t make a long trip much better – better sound insulation could do.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    VW Multivan Camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢225Width ↔150Height ↕132

    The Multivan is for you if size, versatility & looking cool are your main criteria (and you can afford it – it costs 3x as much as an MPV like a Sharan, but it isn’t 3 times better for camping – it is a cult car that offers a lot of space in a relatively small package, with the added bonus of being able to move and turn the seats and table around as you please + fold them down into a bed. But they can also get in a way and sometimes it’s necessary to remove them to take full advantage of the boot’s size. And you’ll have to get some kind of camping box or a bed to sleep comfortably and make the most of the sheer space. The Multivan is a bit of a cult car and keeps its value even with very high mileage (300K+) and 10+ years of age, so be prepared to pay the price. There aren’t as many DIY Multivan camping conversions – precisely for the reasons outlined on this page, in short – it’s almost the most expensive car of the range where you are paying for flexible seats that you would take out anyway for a DIY conversion. But there are plenty of manufactured camping boxes that you can carry in the boot (behind all the rear seats) and extend when camping (see image gallery for some examples, with and without the rear seats). But then, you can do that in the cheaper Caravelle too, so make sure you know why you’re paying up for a Multivan. Overall, a Multivan can be a great camper – but not out of the box. If you just want to try car camping out, you’ll be better off with a much cheaper MPV that you convert to an occasional camper. And if you like it and decide to commit to car camping, you can try out a Multivan with a camping extension.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Ford Tourneo Connect camper (Grand)

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢217Width ↔119Height ↕95

    The Tourneo is an even more comfortable version of the already comfortable panel van Transit Connect. You get a higher trim standard and drive comfort with a big boot for all your camping needs. When the seats are folded down, the boot height is 95cm, which isn’t much for an MPV, but good enough. Go for the Grand version of course – you’ll get a 40cm longer boot – that’s a lot. It drives well, but it also eats a bit more than other MPVs though. The barn doors on most models are a downside, but they have a small plus point – you can open them all the way towards the front, by the sides of the car so that they won’t get in your way. You just won’t have a roof like you would with a tailgate.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Toyota Prius camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢190Width ↔102Height ↕79

    The Prius gives you unmatched consumption whilst still boasting a good-size boot for a station wagon/estate body type, even with the battery being in the boot. So if you are looking for a low-fuel cost car that you still can sleep in, the Toyota Prius is a very good choice.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Honda CR-V Camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢185Width ↔101Height ↕91

    It’s a good enough camper if you push the front seats forward – giving you enough room to sleep. But its main advantage is that it’s a 4×4, not its size (there are bigger cars in our DB for that).


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  • EU/UK
    US
    4x4

    Nissan Pathfinder camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢200Width ↔116Height ↕84

    This is one of the best SUVs in our database for car camping – a big boot overall, but its width stands out the most (see comparison with other SUVs). But – it’s not very well rated on top car reviewing websites and it does eat a lot! You might find the Subaru Forester a bit better (2.8/5 Nimblecamper rating – similar size, better consumption and comfort), or, if you are after something more rugged and mostly for off-road camping, try the Mitsubishi Pajero (Shogun)

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  • EU/UK
    US
    4x4

    Subaru Outback Camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢185Width ↔107Height ↕74

    A very popular SUV amongst camping enthusiasts – not the biggest one, but has enough room for sleeping, plus offers an excellent safety rating and is one of the best cars you can take off-road, well rugged and well-built, matched only by the rugged Mitsubishi Pajero (Shogun).


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Chevrolet Orlando camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢178Width ↔101Height ↕65

    The Chevrolet Orlando was aimed at the MPV market, albeit unsuccessfully – it’s not as big as its rivals a fact that even its lower price didn’t rectify. It’s about as big as a VW Touran, with a smaller rear opening. On the positive side, it does offer some clever storage solutions and its seats fold completely flat, so all you need to do is throw in a mattress and you’re good to sleep in it. Could be a good quick camping solution – just carry the mattress and sleeping gear in the boot and you are always ready for an impromptu camping stop.


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  • EU/UK
    4x4

    Land Rover Discovery camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢185Width ↔122Height ↕84

    The Land Rover Discovery offers about average boot length and height compared to other SUV CampersΒ but gives you more width. It is a luxurious (and hence expensive) car so it’s not the usual choice people go for when looking for an SUV camper. It offers great off-road capabilities and more luxuries than your average SUV. It’s consumption is also a bit higher than a typical SUV in our database.


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  • EU/UK

    Kia Sportage camper boot size

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢185Width ↔104Height ↕81

    The Kia Sportage is a typical SUV that offers enough sleeping area when the seats are folded away properly. It doesn’t offer anything in terms of size that any other compact SUV in our database doesn’t offer too. It’s boot is 7 cm narrower and 5 cm lower than it’s closest rival, the Toyota RAV4 or Honda CR-V. If you like it’s size, but prefer a more rugged outdoor SUV, I’d suggest Subaru Outback.


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  • EU/UK
    US

    Tesla Model X camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢210Width ↔107Height ↕72

    What Tesla can you camp in? The Model X for sure! The boot easily turns into a bed.Β You can sleep comfortably in a Tesla Model X – easily fit a 200x100cm mattress inside. There are some DIY conversions to be found out there too (see images and videos below). The biggest advantage of the Model X is the hidden storage compartments you don’t get in many other cars (two big ones in the boot [or one if you have a 7-seater] and one in the front under the hood). Good to store most of your camping gear. There are two things that might put you off – the price tag of course and the relatively low boot height.

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  • EU/UK
    4x4

    Skoda Yeti camper

    Boot dimensions:
    Length ⤢174Width ↔101Height ↕80

    Skoda Yeti offers about 10cm shorter boot compared to other SUV CampersΒ but comes with much lower consumption. It has been awarded Family Car of the Year byΒ Top Gear Magazine. It’s a good car that you can convert into a camper easily, but don’t expect too much headroom or storage space. It’s best combined with a suitable car tent that will give you plenty of living room when camping, whilst you sleep in the boot.


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